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Activity for gmcgath‭

Type On... Excerpt Status Date
Edit Post #286566 Post edited:
Fixing a typo in the title
3 months ago
Suggested Edit Post #286566 Suggested edit:
Fixing a typo in the title
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helpful 3 months ago
Comment Post #286577 Some of the gifts that she says she doesn't want are also Spanish, so I don't think the exotic source of the boots is the point here.
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4 months ago
Comment Post #286566 A "Spanish boot" is a torture device. The term has been applied to several instruments of torture that operate on different principles. The boot may be tightened with screws, with or without spikes inside, or it may be porous and have boiling water or other hot liquids poured on it. http://www.art...
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4 months ago
Comment Post #286503 There is no requirement, either by Cage or by performance tradition, for a conductor to "gesture and hand wave." I wouldn't even describe this video as "hand waving"; he holds up his hands still and occasionally changes their position. He does rush the tempo, though. :) The video is only 3 minute...
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4 months ago
Edit Post #286519 Initial revision 4 months ago
Answer A: Why do you need sheet music of John Cage's 4′33″ to perform it?
Obviously you don't need it. You don't need to have an instrument. Technically, you don't need to do anything. The point of "performing" 4'33" is to create an atmosphere. To do this, performers generally follow the conventions of performing a piece, such as sitting at an instrument, turning the pages...
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4 months ago
Comment Post #286274 Not to mention a bit from "The Barber of Seville" and the folk songs "Au clair de la lune" and "Ah, vous dirai-je, maman" (aka "Twinkle, twinkle little star").
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5 months ago
Edit Post #286274 Initial revision 5 months ago
Answer A: Did W. F. Bach copy J. S. Bach in this piece?
I don't hear much of a resemblance. If nothing else, the W. F. Bach is in quadruple time, while the J. S. Bach is in triple time. But to answer your broader question: Copying motifs and tunes from other composers was widely accepted in the Baroque era and even later. Music at the time was written...
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5 months ago
Comment Post #286146 I just had to figure this out for myself in MuseScore, and I couldn't find anything that explained how to do it in a satisfactory way. I hope that discussion of music software is considered OK here and that this is useful. Feel free to edit my response if there are formatting issues.
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6 months ago
Edit Post #286147 Initial revision 6 months ago
Answer A: How do I insert a verse in an existing MuseScore document's lyrics?
MuseScore allows moving a line of lyrics up or down. Start by selecting a word in the last line of lyrics. Right-click on it and chose "Select > More..." This will bring up a dialog like the following: Select Dialog Check "Same subtype", which will have the current verse specified by default...
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6 months ago
Edit Post #286146 Initial revision 6 months ago
Question How do I insert a verse in an existing MuseScore document's lyrics?
If I want to insert a verse in the lyrics of a MuseScore document, e.g., adding a verse that goes above all the others, how do I move the existing verses to make room for it? Obviously it can be done tediously, a word at a time, but is there an efficient way to do it?
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6 months ago
Edit Post #286137 Initial revision 6 months ago
Question Why are lute-like instruments found in so many cultures?
Instruments with parallel strings, a resonating body, and a neck over which the strings are stretched appear in many cultures. The oud is an Arabic instrument, from which the European lute developed. The guitar may have a separate origin. The banjo has West African origins. China has the erhu, and Ja...
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6 months ago
Edit Post #285341 Initial revision 9 months ago
Answer A: Why was Haydn "the father of the symphony"?
I've just come across the following in Ernest Hutcheson's The Literature of the Piano, and it's the closest thing to an answer I've found. > In truth he [Haydn] was a greater originator than either Mozart or Beethoven; he created the sonata form, they adopted it, expanded it, and experimented wit...
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9 months ago
Comment Post #285184 Another candidate is Giovanni Sammartini, who was born about 15 years after J. S. Bach but sounds more like Johann Christian Bach. He wrote 3-movement symphonies for string orchestra with continuo. They may have been the earliest symphonies (in the classical-era sense) that are still performed.
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10 months ago
Edit Post #285184 Initial revision 10 months ago
Question Why was Haydn "the father of the symphony"?
Joseph Haydn is frequently called "the father of the symphony." He made important advances in symphonic composition, but he wasn't the first to write symphonies in the classical form. The title arguably should go to Johann Stamitz, an important composer of the Mannheim school. During the Baroque e...
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10 months ago
Edit Post #285053 Initial revision 10 months ago
Answer A: Is there any genre of music (or a song) that eschews silence or rests within a piece?
There are a number of pieces in classical music called "perpetuum mobile" or "moto perpetuo." Their characteristic is an even, rapid stream of notes up to the end. Probably the best known example is an orchestral piece by Johann Strauss, Jr. Other examples include "Perpetuum mobile" by Mendelssohn, f...
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10 months ago
Edit Post #284707 Post edited:
11 months ago
Edit Post #284707 Initial revision 11 months ago
Answer A: Why did classical-era composers associate keys with moods?
I think I can now answer this, based on research I've done since posting the question. The underlying issue is that it's mathematically impossible to make all keys exactly right with any one tuning. Equal temperament, which gives all keys the same (slightly wrong) pitch ratios for each interval, d...
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11 months ago
Comment Post #284620 It gets complicated there. Bach advocated not equal temperament, but a system known a bit awkwardly in English as "well temperament." It's suitable for playing in all keys, but the fifths aren't all equally detuned. There seems to be historical uncertainty about just when equal temperament displaced ...
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11 months ago
Edit Post #284620 Post edited:
12 months ago
Edit Post #284620 Initial revision 12 months ago
Question Why did classical-era composers associate keys with moods?
Composers of the classical era, especially Mozart and Beethoven, considered certain keys appropriate for certain moods. What reasons did they have for this? There are practical reasons for choosing certain keys. Making the best use of an instrument's range may require a certain key. Violin concert...
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12 months ago
Comment Post #284416 I ordered a singer's mask from Broadway Relief Project. It's a bit expensive but is nicely constructed and lets me take deep breaths without inhaling the mask.
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12 months ago
Comment Post #284573 What question are you asking? Is it what motivates the organizers of piano competitions, or is it what is "logical" to do? Much of your question is devoted to recordings, which have a different set of purposes and economic incentives from competitions. It's difficult to give an answer to your questio...
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12 months ago
Comment Post #284416 | If you stand far enough away from anyone else, the mask is completely unnecessary. Current CDC information says that the risk is largely from aerosols that spread through an indoor space, not droplets that fly from one person to another. Six feet has never been a magic number, just a guideline. ...
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12 months ago
Edit Post #284416 Initial revision about 1 year ago
Question Best techniques for singing while masked
What are the best techniques for singing while masked? Completely or partially uncovering while singing defeats the purpose, since projecting our voices increases the chance of spewing pathogens into the air. There are two problems to overcome: (1) When you take a deep breath, you tend to suck the ma...
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about 1 year ago
Comment Post #284203 It's certainly an unusual instrument. An interview says that Maria Franz plays the "ravanhata," more often spelled "ravanahatha," which is an old Indian instrument with somewhat similar characteristics. But the instrument she plays looks very different from the traditional ravanahatha. It may be one ...
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about 1 year ago
Comment Post #281297 The main motif sticks to the pentatonic notes do, re, mi, sol, and la. As a whole, though, the music doesn't. It doesn't sound especially Chinese to me, but that may be what you're hearing as Chinese.
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about 1 year ago
Edit Post #283895 Initial revision about 1 year ago
Answer A: Did Schoenberg consider dodecaphony in terms of democracy and freedom?
Schoenberg's "emancipation of the dissonance" referred to escaping the idea that dissonances are acceptable only if they're resolved. I don't see any political dimension in it. Democracy is even further from his approach to music. Most people in Western culture prefer tonal music, and he was clearly ...
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about 1 year ago